Book It: October 2022

If you have published a book within the past six months or have one coming out in the near future, please e-mail the editor a high-resolution jpg of the cover, along with a 50-word-or-less description of the book and its publication date. magazine@trinity.utoronto.ca

 

DOMINIQUE BRÉGENT-HEALD ’95
In Northern Getaway, Dominique Brégent-Heald investigates the connections between film and tourism in Canada during the first half of the 20th century, exploring the economic, pedagogical, geopolitical, and socio-cultural contexts and aspirations of tourism films. Using evidence from a wide range of archival sources and drawing from current scholarship in film history and tourism studies, the author demonstrates how Canada was an innovator in using film to shape and project a recognizable destination brand. (McGill-Queen’s University Press)

 

MARC BHALLA ’99
ODR: Yesterday. Today. Tomorrow. reflects over 20 years of research, practice, presentations and podcasts about online dispute resolution. Co-written with Colm Brannigan and including a foreword by ODR legend Colin Rule, the book includes Marc Bhalla reflecting on serving as Trinity College’s Head of Arts & Science in the 1997-1998 academic year. During that time, he was part of a student group that organized a visit and lecture by Dr. Stephen Hawking. (Shadow of the Law Publications)

 

GLORIA HILDEBRANDT ’79
Views & Vistas: Favourite Photographs from the Whole Niagara Escarpment in Canada— Niagara Falls to Manitoulin Island features more than 150 full-colour, full-page photographs by Mike Davis. This collection includes breathtaking scenery, lakes, rivers, waterfalls, rock formations, wild birds and animals.(Niagara Escarpment Views)

 

THOMAS GERRY ’71
Legacies of Ancient Greece in Contemporary Perspectives provides readers with opportunities to reconnect with the origins of thought in an astonishingly wide variety of areas: politics, economics, art, spirituality, gender relations, medicine, literature, philosophy, music, and so on. As the chapters in the book show, Classical Greek thought still informs much of contemporary culture. (Vernon Press)

 

CHRISTIAN LEUPRECHT ’96
Democracy needs to be defended, and intelligence is the first line of defence. However, the liberal-democratic norm of limited state intervention in the lives of citizens means that security and accountability are in tension, assert the authors of Intelligence as Democratic Statecraft. In the context of changing technology and threat vectors that have significantly affected, altered, and expanded the role, powers, and capabilities of intelligence, Leuprecht and co-author Hayley McNorton compare the institutions, composition, practices, characteristics, and cultures of intelligence accountability systems across the world’s oldest and most powerful intelligence alliance. (Oxford University Press)

 

MICHAEL WILSON ’59
The late Honourable Michael Wilson was a Canadian politician and business professional, and Trinity’s 11th chancellor. Something within Me highlights how Wilson’s personal life blended with his political life and accomplishments, detailing his advocacy for mental health awareness as well his involvement in important pieces of legislation that made significant impacts in Canadian political and economic history. These deeply personal stories, particularly those of a father grappling with his son’s illness and death, remind us of the lives behind the political personas that shape our world. (University of Toronto Press)

 

MICHAEL ZEITLIN ’79
Faulkner, Aviation, and Modern War frames William Faulkner’s airplane narratives against major scenes of the early 20th century: the Great War, the rise of European fascism in the 1920s and 30s, the Second World War, and the aviation arms race extending from the Wright Flyer in 1903 into the Cold War era. Placing biographical accounts of Faulkner’s time in the Royal Air Force Canada against analysis of such works as Soldiers’ Pay (1926), “All the Dead Pilots” (1931), Pylon (1935), and A Fable (1954), this book situates Faulkner’s aviation writing within transatlantic historical contexts that have not been sufficiently appreciated in Faulkner’s work. (Bloomsbury Academic)

 

As published in the October Living Trinity e-Newsletter.

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